Featured Researcher: Chris B
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Featured Researcher: Chris B

This month’s Featured Researcher is Christopher B, a recent law graduate with a Juris Doctorate and Bachelor’s in Anthropology. Prior to joining AOP, Chris B took a few IP classes and an introductory patent law class in school.

ChrisB

Like most Researchers, Chris enjoys the hunt. “The thrill of getting a task, going out, finding an obscure reference, then getting feedback that your intuition was correct all along– especially when it’s on something outside of your normal comfort zone,” he said. “It teaches you to not be intimidated of knowledge.”

Additionally, Chris finds that “keeping up with the news and having a broad array of interests,” is very useful for research. “Having an intermediate knowledge of technology is a huge plus, especially understanding how search engines work, and how to formulate your searches,” he said.

Chris generally utilizes resources such as Google Scholar, Library, and Archive.org to find unique, high-quality references for submission.

Since joining AOP, Chris has learned about the anatomy of a patent, what makes a good or bad claim, and all sorts of emerging technologies that he says he’s “excited to see hit the market in the next decade.”  While doing a product mapping study, for example, Chris discovered an emerging product that controls your tech based off your hand gestures, and thinks he might get one eventually.

Chris B’s Top Tips for Research:

  1. Master your Google-Fu: understand how to restrict things like dates, search certain sites, use all of the patent/scholar services, use translator to see if foreign translation is worth pursuing, etc.
  2. Don’t hesitate to reach out to someone you think may have something you need — more often than not, you’ll find people are happy to help.
  3. If the study is based on an emerging technology, read up on it, especially in news articles. Find out why it’s relevant and try to understand how and where the new ideas may have developed from.