Meet David, Researcher of the Year 2015
Share
Click here to close
Click here to close
Subscribe here

Meet David, Researcher of the Year 2015

me passport faceDavid was selected as Article One’s 2015 Researcher of the Year, as announced to the Community in a recent AOP Blog post. The AOP Team spoke with David to learn more about his experience on the platform and thoughts on his big win.

“It’s an honor and a real thrill to be recognized in that way,” he said. “AOP is right up there as offering the most challenging research topics and the most substantial rewards for successful work, and that alone would be more than enough to keep me going. But getting recognized as Researcher of the Year gave me a thrill that’s hard to put into words, and a ton of encouragement. My thanks to both AOP and my fellow researchers for setting the bar high and for continuing to innovate. Can’t wait to see what 2016 has in store!”

An environmental policy expert from the United States, David had no prior experience with patent research before joining AOP in 2011. But having worked for Google Answers and other Q&A services on various research topics has given him plenty of experience with specialty online research.

When asked about his motivation to continue working on Studies he replied that,”It’s an important source of extra income, a way to hone my research skills, and an opportunity to learn about the whole new area or prior art research.” He continued, “There’s also the enormous, slightly weird, sense of satisfaction I get from coming across that really hard-to-find document that turns out to be very responsive to the study at hand.”

His best advice for other AOP Researchers? “Whatever data sources you use, really learn how they work. There are a lot of tricks to Google, and a lot of tremendous sources that Google never sees,” said David. “For instance, I use TESS a lot (the trademarks database), but it really took me several years to figure out how to take best advantage of it.”

“Sometimes, a stranger offers a hand in an unbelievably helpful way,” he said. “I once contacted the archive library at some big company, and she really went out of her way to track down some obscure product manuals, scan them, and send them to me as PDFs.  They turned out to be important submissions for the study I was working on.”