The EU Chemical Industry Now Speaks Croatian
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The EU Chemical Industry Now Speaks Croatian

The EU Chemical Industry Now Speaks Croatian

CroatiaThe Translation Centre for the Bodies of the European Union announced yesterday that its multilingual terminology database for the European Chemicals Agency, ECHA-term, is now available in Croatian.

Croatia became the 28th member state of the European Union on July 1, 2013. Although it has not yet joined the single currency or the Schengen Area, REACH (Regulation concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals), CLP (Classification, Labeling and Packaging), Biocides and PIC Regulations, as well as all other EU Chemicals legislation became effective that same day.

ECHA is responsible for implementing the EU’s chemicals regulations so that industry companies both comply with legislation and meet public safety standards for the industry. ECHA-term’s English source terms are extracted from a comprehensive set of its regulatory and technical terminology, hazard and precautionary statements, descriptors, pictograms and more.

The addition of Croatian brings ECHA-term coverage to the complete 23 official languages of the EU. The database’s interface and user documentation as well as 300 REACH-related Croatian entries — with its terms, definitions, references, contexts, help, and notes — are now available for free either via online access or in Excel and TermBase eXchange formats. According to the announcement, more Croatian CLP and biocide terminology, as well as coverage of “substances of very high concern,” will be added later this year.

After a two-year initiative to improve translation quality and terminology access, the agency launched ECHA-term in April 2011. It was an immediate success — in its first week, the agency logged more than 5,000 database enquiries and over 100 views of its download functionality from users in 58 countries.

As of May of this year, ECHA has made the database even easier for industry businesses and the linguists serving them — users may download its 1,000-strong terminology and provide comments on the entries without registration.

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