Translation Tech – February 2014 Edition
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Translation Tech – February 2014 Edition

Translation Tech – February 2014 Edition

Movie TranslationWe’re back with this month’s translation and technology report. No surprise, we’ve got news of yet more Google investment in the language processing field and social media interests in multilingual mobile apps. But we’ve also got an important update from the U.S. military’s language front, which we’ve reported on before, as well as news on what’s sure to become standard in any foreign-film lover’s toolbox.

Pinterest boosts language features for key mobile-driven markets

TechCrunch.com: “Also important, a modern mobile site is key to Pinterest’s ongoing international expansion efforts, as the company understands that some users’ first visit to the service will be via a mobile browser, like the basic mobile browser option installed on some feature phones today. Last month, the company announced an expansion into Indonesia, and translation into Korean, for example. And late last year, it was localized into languages including Russian, Turkish, Czech, Slovak, Japanese, and several Nordic languages, too. The site is available in Spanish, French, Portuguese, Dutch, and German, as well as English.” – Now With 75% Of All Traffic Coming From Apps, Pinterest Revamps Its Mobile Website

MyLingo translation app wants to be your next movie night date

FT.com/management: “MyLingo is a smartphone app that enables non-English speaking film buffs to listen to a translation of the actors’ dialogue through their mobile device as they watch a mainstream English-language movie at the cinema. The Los Angeles-based business was started in June 2012 by Olenka Polak and her brother Adam while she was still an undergraduate at Harvard University. The idea won the Ivy League college’s Innovation Challenge.” – App translates English-language movies

New heights ahead for Google Translate with DeepMind acquisition

DigitalTrends.com: “Google is ringing in 2014 with a spending spree, first dropping $3.2 billion to acquire Nest Technologies and now spending a reported $400 million (or more) on the UK-based artificial intelligence outfit DeepMind. It’s no secret that Google has an interest in artificial intelligence; after all, technologies derived from AI research help fuel Google’s core search and advertising businesses. … Google Translate is already well regarded, but deep-learning neural networks could make it even better. Imagine traveling to a country where you don’t know the language and speaking with someone in a store using your smartphone; its microphone could hear their speech and pump an English translation into an earbud for you, then translate your speech for them.” – How DeepMind’s artificial intelligence will make Google even smarter

U.S. government to open language translation data to public

Latinpost.com: “Following requests from the R&D community, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has now published an open source catalog containing all the code and publications related to its research. The endeavor, the government agency states, is to provide government investments with a flexible technology base. … The open source catalog can be found at http://go.usa.gov/BDhY, and contains software toolkits and peer-reviewed publications from the XDATA program in the agency’s Information Innovation Office (I2O), one six main offices. At launch, the catalog contains data from over 60 projects, and DARPA states that it will expand the publicly available information in the future, including data from the Broad Operational Language Translation and Visual Media Reasoning programs.” – DARPA Publishes Open Source Catalog Containing Code and Publications from I2O Research

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