Justin Simpson discusses the AIA and China as a common filing destination

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Justin Simpson, of RWS recently sat down with IPPro The Internet to discuss patent filing trends in 2016. A key trend he identified is that filing numbers are still being affected by changes associated with the American Invents Act from March of 2013.

Simpson goes on to explain that in early 2016, because patent applications had been brought forward to beat the AIA deadline, there were far fewer filings in early 2016. Now in 2017, all of that has passed and filing numbers are back to the normal levels that they were before the AIA flood.

He also discusses China as an increasingly common filing jurisdiction and references RWS’ upcoming Global Patent & IP Trends Indicator, to be released later this June.

Read the article in entirety on page seven here

IP Watchdog Features Our 2017 Global Patent & IP Trends Indicator

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We recently launched our 8th annual Global Patent & IP Trends Indicator. The report gives patent professionals an insight into the IP world and highlights how your colleagues are affected by the changing patent landscape. IP Watchdog recently covered the Indicator and sat down with RWS ‘ Justin Simpson for an interview.

IP Watchdog mentioned several statistics from the report including that more than 73% of respondents filed patents in four or more countries in 2016. This is something that Simpson accounts to the increased globalization within the intellectual property space. 87% of respondents have been filing into BRIC countries for the last five years, showing that the world is getting smaller. 

Despite the increased number of international patent application filings, one-third of the survey respondents had their IP budgets reduced during 2016. Simpson accounts this to the patentability of software and the reduced amount of freedom in the sector; whilst inventors may have filed all five of their inventions 15 years ago, now they may just file one or two, thus leading to a reduced budget overall.

Download the full Global Patent & IP Trends Indicator by clicking here. Feel free to get in contact with your closest RWS office with any questions.

WIPR’s feature of Our 8th annual Global Patent & IP Trends Indicator

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Since the publication of our 8th annual Global Patent & IP Trends Indicator, we have been featured in a variety of IP publications. Please see below for our feature from WIPR and get in contact with your nearest RWS office with any questions on our findings.

WIPR considered the Unitary Patent Court (UPC) Research in the IP Trends Indicator which showed that nearly half (47%) of the respondents remain undecided over whether they will use the unitary patent. This is ongoing as the introduction of the UPC remains delayed by the German Constitutional Court.

Justin Simpson, founder of the inovia platform, shared that the America Invents Act (AIA) has created uncertainty as those who filed prior to the AIA start date in March 2013 caused a flood of applications at their 30 month date, leading to a surge in filing numbers. Filing trends as reported in the Trends Indicator are now back to a stable level, gradually increasing throughout 2016. Read the full article here.

“Britain, your IP costs just went up”

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Earlier this month, our Founder, Justin Simpson published an opinion article with Real Business Magazine discussing how the recent Brexit will effect the upcoming Unitary patent.

The terms of the Unitary patent were agreed in 2012 & 2013 and needed to be ratified by 13 of 25 countries (including the UK, France and Germany). The UK legislation passed the UP by both Houses of Parliament in March 2016. The last thing left was for the UK to notify the EU that they ratified the UPC and wait for two other countries to ratify it. In all likelihood, it would have come into force sometime early next year. But then there was the Brexit. 

Read Justin’s article in entirety here. Do you agree with his argument that there is a slim chance the Unitary patent will come into fruition early next year? We invite you to discuss in the comment section below.